Sunday, June 7, 2015

1.Iran Rejects Even Limited Inspector Access to Military Sites ; 2.Russia had previously affirmed that it would reject any “automaticity” in reimposing sanctions should inspectors discover Iran’s cheating on a nuclear deal June 7, 2015


  Iranian Brigadier General Massoud Jazayeri was quoted by the Tasnim news agency as  declaring that Iran will not allow even limited access to military sites under any final nuclear agreement. “Any kind of inspection of Iran’s military sites, including managed and restricted access, is unacceptable,” Brigadier General Massoud Jazayeri was quoted by Reuters as saying. 

Jazayeri’s statement echoes those of  other Iranian leaders’ stated stances on access for international inspectors to nuclear sites, including Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who has said that “absolutely” no permission will be given for inspections.
The tough stance on military sites comes as a June 30 deadline approaches for Iran and world powers to reach a final nuclear deal . Access to Iranian military sites is one of a number of key sticking points in the negotiations.
This unanimous position by Iran's top military and religious leadership conflicts sharply with the assurances recently delivered to Jewish audiences by Pres. Obama, the US State Department, the  US Treasury Department , Amb. Shapiro and “anonymous White House aides with close familiarity to the negotiations.”
For example,US Treasury Secretary Lew at the Jerusalem Post Conference in New York attempted to downplay a  recent REPORT by the New York Times stating that Iran’s nuclear fuel stockpiles had gone up since signing an interim agreement in 2013, supposedly freezing its fuel production. Lew said the fluctuations were normal and expected.
He also claimed that  Russia and China would not have veto power at the U.N. over the automatic “snap back” of sanctions should Iran be found to be cheating on the comprehensive nuclear deal.
 However Russia had previously affirmed that  it would reject any “automaticity” in reimposing sanctions should inspectors discover Iran’s cheating on a nuclear deal, and many critics of the emerging agreement have insisted an international sanctions regime would be near-impossible to re-enforce once the current sanctions are lifted.